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Agreement On Trade-Related Aspects Of Intellectual Property Rights Covers

Daniele Archibugi and Andrea Filippetti[34] argue that the importance of TRIPS in the process of developing and disseminating knowledge and innovation has been overestimated by its supporters. This was supported by the FINDINGs of the United Nations that many low-protection countries regularly benefit from significant foreign direct investment (FDI). [35] Analysis of OECD countries in the 1980s and 1990s (which extended the lifespan of drug patents by 6 years) showed that, although the total number of registered products increased slightly, the average innovation index remained unchanged. [36] On the other hand, J-rg Baten, Nicola Bianchi and Petra Moser (2017)[37] find historical evidence that compulsory licensing – a key mechanism for weakening IP rights under Article 31 of TRIPS – can effectively lead to the promotion of inventions by increasing the threat to competition in areas of low competition. They argue, however, that the benefits of weakening intellectual property rights depend heavily on the ability of governments to make a credible commitment to use them only in exceptional cases, since companies can invest less in research and development if they expect repeated episodes of mandatory licensing. The general objectives of the ON TRIPS agreement are contained in the preamble to the agreement, which echoes the fundamental negotiating objectives of the Uruguay Round, set in the TRIPS zone by the 1986 Punta del Este Declaration and the 1988/89 mid-term review. These objectives include reducing distortions and barriers to international trade, promoting effective and adequate protection of intellectual property rights, and ensuring that measures and procedures to enforce intellectual property rights do not themselves become barriers to legitimate trade. These objectives should be understood in conjunction with Article 7 Objectives, under which the protection and implementation of intellectual property rights should contribute to the promotion of technological innovation and the transfer and dissemination of technology, to the mutual benefit of producers and users of technological knowledge, and in a way that promotes social and economic well-being, and to the balance of rights and obligations. Article 8, entitled “Principles,” recognizes the right of members to take action for public health and other public interest reasons and to prevent abuses of intellectual property rights, provided these measures are consistent with the provisions of the TRIPS agreement. In addition to the basic intellectual property standards set out in the TRIPS agreement, many nations have committed to bilateral agreements to adopt a higher level of protection.